Giuseppe Onufrio

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INTERVIEW WITH Giuseppe Onufrio
("Greenpeace Italy" – Executive Director - hhttp://www.greenpeace.org/italy/it/)
 
Premise
Greenpeace International is an independent global campaigning organization that acts to change attitudes and behavior, to protect and conserve the environment and to promote peace. Nowdays, there are several threats to our Planet equilibrium: Climate change (and the related energetic topic), Wasteful and destructive fishing that threatens biodiversity in the Oceans; Deforestation and loss of Earth’s biodiversity; Nuclear weapons, civil wars and terroristic threats; Chemicals in today's products;  Intensive and irresponsible agriculture, with the use of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). But what are the topics on which Greenpeace focuses more? What is the biggest threat to our Planet? What can the countries (and the single citizen)  do in order to stop Climate change? Giuseppe Onufrio, Greenpeace Italy Executive Director, will answer to these and other questions.

Mamadou Biteye

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INTERVIEW WITH Mamadou Biteye
(Regional Director for "Oxfam GB in West Africa" - http://www.oxfam.org/)

Premise
First in 2005, then in 2010, Sahel, the semiarid region of north-central Africa south of the Sahara Desert, was strongly struck by famine. Drought and famine in this region are not occasional phenomena, and underline trend of increasing chronic vulnerability.  Why these countries are not able to solve these problems? What are the long term consequences of food crisis in these regions? What are the actions to implement in order to increase Sahel resilience from external factors and to avoid future food crisis? Mamadou Biteye, Regional Director for Oxfam GB in West Africa since February 2009, will answer to these and other questions.
 

Peter Gubbels

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INTERVIEW WITH Peter Gubbels
("Groundswell’s Co-Coordinator for West Africa" - http://www.groundswellinternational.org/

Premise
First in 2005, then in 2010, Sahel, the semiarid region of north-central Africa south of the Sahara Desert, was strongly struck by a severe food crisis. Drought and hunger and child malnutrition in this region are not occasional phenomena, and underline trend of increasing chronic vulnerability.  Why these countries are failing in solving these problems? What are the long term consequences of food crisis in these regions? What are the actions to implement in order to increase Sahel resilience from external factors and to avoid future food crisis? Peter Gubbels, Groundswell’s Co-Coordinator for West Africa, with his 30 years of experience in rural development, including 20 years living and working in West Africa, will answer to these and other questions.
 

Maurizio Pallante

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INTERVIEW WITH Maurizio Pallante
(Italian essayist, founder of The "Movimento per la Decrescita Felice" - http://decrescitafelice.it/
 
Premise
Since 2000 in Italy a Movement known as “Movement of the Happy Decrease” (Movimento della Decrescita Felice - MDF) has progressively gained more approval. It focuses on the demythologizing of the “economic growth with an end to itself”, and on the creation of a more sober, empathic and economically stable society. The movement, clearly inspired by the theme of the “decrease” theorized by Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen, founder of“the Bio-economy”, and aligned with Serge Latouche thought, is based on the assumption that the correlation between economic growth and well-being is not necessarily positive; on the opposite there are some evidences characterized by both a growth in the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and a reduction in the well-being. What are the principles driving the Happy Decrease? Why we have to support them? Can they represent the solution to the main current problems of developed countries (high public debt, youth unemployment,  high levels of pollution and high national ecological footprints)? Maurizio Pallante, founder and president of the Association for Decrescita Felice (http://decrescitafelice.it/), will answer to these and other questions.
 

John F.May

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INTERVIEW WITH John F.May
(Demographer, Visiting Fellow at the "Center for Global Development" and Adjunct Professor of Demography at "Georgetown University," author of “World Population Policies: Their Origin, Evolution, and Impact,” New York: Springer, 2012)

Premise
John F.May, in his book, tells the story of how the series of international population conferences that ran from Bucharest in 1974, through Mexico City in 1984, to Cairo in 1994 gradually created a global consensus in favor of a broad developmental approach to population policy, an approach that emphasized: the empowerment of women, improvements in maternal and young child health, voluntary family planning embedded in a broader reproductive health framework, and the protection of individual reproductive rights – the so-called Cairo Consensus. He shows how the success of voluntary programs in many countries, as well as the excesses that led to human rights abuses in others, contributed to this consensus and how demographic changes over the past two or three decades have produced new concerns andnew policy discussions about excessively low birth rates, rapid population aging, high rates of international migration, and sex selection. This book tells how difficult these issues are in developed countries as population aging challenges the survival of the post-industrial socioeconomic model and immigration is often perceived as a threat to national identities.
Now the increasing ecological impact of humanity on our Planet is raising an important question: Will our Planet survive to a further increase in the world population? John May is going to answer this and other questions.