Andy Goldring

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INTERVIEW WITH Andy Goldring
("Permaculture Association in UK"– Chief Executive -  http://www.permaculture.org.uk/)

Premise
The word 'permaculture' comes from 'permanent agriculture' and 'permanent culture' - it is about living lightly on the planet, and making sure that we can sustain human activities for many generations to come, in harmony with nature. Permaculture started in the “70s with Bill Mollison and David Holmgren project to create and develop a framework for a more sustainable agriculture method. Since then Permaculture has been spread around the world. The Permaculture Association is the national charity in the United Kingdom that supports people to learn about and use Permaculture. It started its work in 1983 and now, with a considerable amount of skills, knowledge and experience, helps people who want start a pattern towards Permaculture. But what does exactly mean Permaculture? Could be it the way to face the Peak Oil? How much progress has Permaculture done since its beginning? Andy Goldring, Chief Executive of the Permaculture Association in the UK answered to these and other questions?
 

Matti Kummu

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INTERVIEW WITH Matti Kummu
(Water & Development Research Group - WDRG, Aalto University, Researcher - http://www.wdrg.fi/)

Premise
Matti Kummu is a researcher in the Water & Development Research Group (WDRG), Aalto University, Finland, a cross-disciplinary research group with a long research tradition in water and development issues as well as in integrated management of water resources. In 2012, Matti Kummu, together with other researchers, wrote an article entitled “Lost food, wasted resources: Global food supply chain losses and their impacts on freshwater, cropland, and fertilizer use” in the journal Science of the Total Environment. In this article, he analysed for the first time global scale food supply losses (in terms of kcal) due to lost and wasted food crops, and the amount of natural resources (freshwater, cropland, and fertilisers) that are used to produce them. As other studies, according to Kummu’s one about around one quarter of the total produced food supply is lost within the Food Supply Chain (FSC). By avoiding these losses (waste) the number of undernourished people could be drastically reduced. So what are the causes of food losses? What are the implication on water waste? What are the countries that have to improve more in reducing food losses and waste? Supposing that the problem was solved, the agricultural system would be able to feed the growing population? Matti Kummu answered to these and otherquestions.
 

Mathis Wackernagel

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INTERVIEW WITH  Mathis Wackernagel
("Global Footprint Network," President - http://www.footprintnetwork.org/en/index.php/GFN/)

Premise
Mathis Wackernagel is co-creator of the Ecological Footprint and President of Global Footprint Network, an international sustainability think-tank. Global Footprint Network focuses on bringing about a sustainable human economy in which all can live well within the means of one planet. It proposes the Ecological Footprint, which measures how much nature we use and how much nature we have, as a tool for bringing ecological limits to the center of decision-making everywhere. Recently, Global Footprint Network was named (for the second consecutive year) one of the world’s top 100 non-governmental organizations by the Global Journal. According to the Ecological Footprint account in 2011, today humanity uses the equivalent of 1.5 planets to provide the resources we use and absorb our waste. What does this means and what we can do to save our planet from resource depletion? We asked  Mathis Wackernagel these and other questions.
 

Peter Wadhams

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INTERVIEW WITH Peter Wadhams 
(Head of the "Polar Ocean Physics Group," University of Cambridge)
 

Premise
Peter Wadhams ScD (born 14 May 1948), is professor of Ocean Physics, and Head of the Polar Ocean Physics Group in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge. He is best known for his work on sea ice. From 1970-74 he studied for a PhD at the Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge on "The effect of a sea ice cover on ocean surface waves". Now, with more than 40 years of experience on Sea Ice studies and on Arctic ocean changes, he covers several charges on matters related to Ice melting and Climate change. In a recent interview for "The Guardian", he said that " by 2015-16, the summer Arctic (August to September) would become ice-free". What can we do to avoid this prediction? And what would be the short and long term consequences? Peter Wadhams will answer to these and other questions.
 

Mark Serreze

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INTERVIEW WITH Mark Serreze
("National Snow and Ice Data Center - NSIDC," Director - http://nsidc.org/)

Premise
Mark Serreze is a Professor within the University of Colorado Boulder (CU) Department of Geography and Director of the CU National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), a Research Center specialized in remote sensing of snow and ice, Arctic climate, frozen ground, ice sheets, glaciers, and more.NSIDC began as an analog archive and information center, the World Data Center for Glaciology, to archive data and information from the 1957–1958 International Geophysical Year. Since then, NSIDC has evolved to manage cryosphere-related data ranging from the smallest text file to terabytes of remote sensing data from NASA’s Earth Observing System satellite program. With global warming and Arctic melting, NSIDC analysis are becoming more and more important in order to control the state of Arctic and the Global Warming effects. Why Arctic is more vulnerable to climate change than other areas? What are the main consequences (local and global) of Arctic changes? What can humans do to reverse Arctic Ice melting process? Mark Serreze answered to these and other questions.