Articles

Who emits CO2?

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Almost all of us (perhaps 100% of the alphabetic population) know that Climate Change is caused by an increase of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere and that this is largely caused by the combustion of fossil sources (coal, oil, gas)... But What are the sectors which “emit” more? What the countries? Let's see ... but first ....

Climate Change (2018): the latest figures on temperature, CO2 concentration and arctic melting

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Climate Change has given birth to a big, global debate over the past 30-40 years. Although the scientific community, thanks to the numerous reports by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), agrees on the facts that 1) climate change exists, 2) climate change is caused by anthropogenic factors (by humans), 3) Climate change over the last 200 years has accelerated considerably (it is estimated that Cliamate Change is 170 times faster than in pre-industrial times), there are still people who deny these statements; they claims that climate change is natural and we cannot do anything to change the course of events. This article proposes an analysis of the three major measures (consequences/results) of Climate Change (CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, Global temperature, Arctic ice extent). It’s interesting to note that these three measures converge in one direction: Earth moves towards overheating with tight rhythms.

Doughnut Economics, Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist

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When one first meet the expression Doughnut Economics, he may think of a joke, or perhaps an economic model for managing the supply or the purchase of food. It is not the case! The Doughnut Economic Model proposed by Kate Raworth is a very deep, at the same time philosophic and pragmatic, approach towards the matter of sustainable economy. Thinking that there are 2 lines, 2 limits, 2 boundaries, that, when overpassed, could trigger a serious of nefarious things for human development is very valuable and of practical use for citizens, academics, firms and institutions. Kate Raworth, in her book Doughnut Economics, Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economis, explains clearly the basics for sustainable development

Climate Change: the latest figures on temperature, CO2 concentration and arctic melting

on .

Climate Change has given birth to a big, global debate over the past 30-40 years. Although the scientific community, thanks to the numerous reports by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), agrees on the facts that 1) climate change exists, 2) climate change is caused by anthropogenic factors (by humans), 3) Climate change over the last 200 years has accelerated considerably (it is estimated that Cliamate Change is 170 times faster than in pre-industrial times), there are still people who deny these statements; they claims that climate change is natural and we cannot do anything to change the course of events. This article proposes an analysis of the three major measures (consequences/results) of Climate Change (CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, Global temperature, Arctic ice extent). It’s interesting to note that these three measures converge in one direction: Earth moves towards overheating with tight rhythms.